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The Privacy Resource Centre

Everyone appreciates the value of privacy on some level. That's why being a "peeping Tom" has always been so sternly frowned on by society. But why is privacy being placed on such a high threshold here, on an equal level of importance with the Internet and the pursuit of happiness itself?

To be Sovereign, you must seize control of your own life. A key step in this process is to take control of all knowledge about you. Privacy amounts to the protection of your personal information. Whether it's your personal finances or what you did last night, information about you can be utilized by others to get the better of you. Information is power, and information about you represents power over you. As the Internet makes it possible for information about you to be organized, compiled and recorded, the patterns of your life can be researched by others (including future enemies) and used against you when you least expect it. Those who study these patterns may come to understand you better than you do.

 
Your efforts to protect information about you require constant vigilance. In fact, a popular privacy guide states that to achieve a high degree of privacy, you may have to turn your life upside down. So what should you do? Balance is usually a good motto. Be aware of those activities that leave "tracks" that can be traced later such as web browsing and especially newsgroup posting. Remember that too clean a record might draw attention in and of itself. One of the better privacy strategies is akin to hiding something in plain sight. Blend in with your peers. If your profile looks like everyone else, maybe your personal information will become lost in a sea of information.

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